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The Top 10 Things To Do And See In Youngstorget, Oslo
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The Top 10 Things To Do And See In Youngstorget, Oslo

Picture of Michelle Schmid
Updated: 9 February 2017
In the heart of Norway’s capital city, Youngstorget stands as a memorable and historical area. It’s the sight of many national and cultural events. However, there’s much more to Young’s Square to see and do than just the usual. Here, we take a look at some of the musts…

Walk the Square

Since it is such a famed landmark, a visit to Oslo would not quite make sense without a visit to the actual square of Youngstorget. Surrounded by numerous political offices, there is a colonnade structure on one side of the square and a distinctly unique fountain. The square is always bustling with activity, and while sitting on a public bench or at one of the cafes, visitors are sure to see many different people coming and going. Besides just watching the people go by, though, Youngstorget is a truly pleasant plaza to explore.

Shopping

The area around the square is full of great shopping opportunities. Yet the square itself is not exempt from having numerous vendors with interesting goods for sale. Visitors to the square might find anything from shoemakers to jewelry stalls and old vinyl emporiums. Because the square is so central to the city, many people pass through the area and will come from all over to sell goods or buy gifts. There is always something new to be discovered among the sellers here.

Shopping in Oslo
Shopping in Oslo | © Nina Stössinger/Flickr

Concerts

As a central location that’s alive with the local populace, Youngstorget is often the site of outdoor concerts for the public. With many bars and cafes located around the square, it is a pivotal part of the Oslo nightlife scene too, and a good place for a drink. In the square itself, travelers will often find beer gardens outside, which is nice for before or after a concert. Many times, the concerts are a result of local festivals or political events – so check ahead before arriving!

A concert at Youngstorget
A concert at Youngstorget | © Arbeiderpartiet/Flickr

Farmer’s Market

Youngstorget also serves as a space for a farmer’s market, which is an entirely unique experience to encounter in Oslo. Explore extensive selections of fresh produce and meats or take in a few of the home-made goods in sale, such as jarred jams. It can always be a pleasant adventure to purchase delicious food items from small scale producers. At the same time, nearby the square is the Fiskeriet, which is an extensive fish and seafood shop where customers can purchase fresh marine produce for cooking regional meals.

Regjeringskvartalet
Regjeringskvartalet | © skrytebane/Flickr

Tour the Government Quarter

Nearby Youngstorget is Regjeringskvartalet, or the Government Quarter. This is a collection of buildings related to Norway’s political system. Therefore, it serves as an interesting activity and offers travelers the opportunity to explore the cluster of buildings housing the Prime Minister’s office, along with the offices of numerous other important government individuals. The buildings include original artwork from Pablo Picasso as well as a handful of Norwegian artists, making this a cultural visit on many levels too.

Concert at Sentrum Scene
Concert at Sentrum Scene | © Miljøpartiet De Grønne/Flickr
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Sentrum Scene

For live music lovers, the proximity of Rockefeller Music Hall and, consequently, Sentrum Scene offers a great lure when visiting Youngstorget. Rockefeller has three venues for live music events. Sentrum Scene houses anything from musicals to concerts and special events. Nearby, visitors can hang out at John DEE, a live music club also run by Rockefeller. Whether visiting just to appreciate a concert or to dance the night away, the presence of Sentrum and Rockefeller offers a thrilling and exciting option for travelers close to this central square.

Sentrum Scene, Arbeidersamfunnets plass 1, Oslo, Norway, +47 22 20 32 32

Mamma Mia billboard | © Edgar Zuniga Jr./Flickr
Mamma Mia billboard | © Edgar Zuniga Jr./Flickr
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Folketeateret

Right off the square located in what was formerly an opera house, Folketeateret is a theater venue where visitors can get a taste of drama, cinema and the stage. With a location so close to the center of town, it makes for a pleasant evening of dinner before a fantastic show. The theater has 1,400 seats and has hosted upwards of 400,000 spectators in the past seven years alone!

Folketeateret, Storgata, Oslo, Norway, +47 21 09 65 00

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Team Escape

A group of individuals are placed inside a room and have to work together deciphering clues to escape. While not exactly tied directly to Oslo’s history, this is an adventurous opportunity to spend quality time with friends or family members. Team Escape in Oslo offers three different scenarios that teams of varying sizes can engage in. Players have to book their game ahead of time, so be sure to check out the website and set up a booking before arriving.

Wessels gate 4A, Oslo, Norway, +47 486 10 000

Organ at Oslo Cathedral
Organ at Oslo Cathedral | © mararie/Flickr
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Oslo Cathedral

Dating back to 1697, Oslo Cathedral has witnessed everything from royal weddings to festivals. In the 1800s, the cathedral was rebuilt by German architects and now includes stunning stained-glass windows and a large organ that was built to celebrate the church’s 300th anniversary. An impressive landmark, the cathedral is a great place to visit and get a taste of Oslo’s history. With an original baroque interior and authentic artwork from Norwegian artists, this is definitely a great sightseeing adventure.

Karl Johans gate 11, Oslo, Norway

Trinity Church
Trinity Church | © John Lord/Flickr

Other Churches

There are several other historic churches located near Young’s Square that are worth a visit while in the area. Constructed in the 1800s, the Trinity Church near the Government Quarter is one of the city’s largest churches, featuring a large dome and a Greek cross. Inside, visitors will discover a beautiful interior, including art by Vigeland among other Norwegian artists. Not far from this church, St Edmund’s is a smaller church built like a cathedral in a neo-Gothic style. This church has lovely stained-glass and a bust of Queen Maud of Wales, who occasionally visited.