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What to Wear on a Summer Vacation in Montenegro

Local houses overlooking the mountains in Montenegro
Local houses overlooking the mountains in Montenegro | © Andrey Khrobostov / Alamy Stock Photo
It might cover less territory than the urban area of Beijing, but Montenegro can be an incredibly varied country when it comes to weather conditions. You’ll need plenty of different clothes depending on where in the country you find yourself, and don’t forget to keep one eye on fashion at all times, too.

Montenegro is fast becoming one of the most popular tourist destinations on the southern shores of Europe, as hundreds of thousands flocks to its coast in the hope of discovering something new. Packing for Montenegro isn’t quite as simple as ‘flip flops and bathers, that’ll do’, however.

Ready for the beach

Despite the potential variation in weather, it is important to acknowledge that hundreds of thousands of people are indeed coming to Montenegro in search of sun, sand and sea. Towns like Kotor and Budva are fast becoming some of the hottest destinations on the continent, and we aren’t just talking about temperatures.

Those looking to laze around on beaches all day should obviously bring appropriate beachwear and the usual safety measures – but don’t forget a decent pair of trainers or beach shoes. Many of Montenegro’s beaches are on the stony side and nobody wants to walk around stones without appropriate footwear.

The conservative aspects of Montenegrin society means you’ll likely get some funny looks if you decide to wander around the old towns of the coast in your swimsuit. The best way to avoid those glances is obviously to not wander around in your swimsuit, so pack some light summer clothing for the more explorative parts of your trip. It is also advised to bring a light jacket or something similar for the evenings, as the sea breeze brings temperatures down considerably at night.

Speaking of night, be sure to pack something on the smarter side for your nights on the town. Montenegro is a country packed full of beautiful people who are fully aware of it, and you are expected to make an effort before hitting the bars and clubs. We aren’t talking your complete Sunday best, but a smart outfit or two for a night on the tiles might be the difference between a great experience and drinking cans of beer on a bench.

Aerial view of Sveti Nikola Island near Budva city at Adriatic Sea in Montenegro. © Ajan Alen / Shutterstock

Prepared for the mountains

Montenegro’s seaside might be the most popular attraction, but the country isn’t named after mountains without good reason. Durmitor and Lovćen National Parks are two of the most impressive natural areas in Europe, frequently drawing comparisons to paradise or the moon from astounded visitors. Temperatures here in summer are considerably lower than at the sea, so be prepared for cool afternoons and seriously chilly evenings.

The hiking trails of Durmitor are some of the most accessible in Europe, but that doesn’t mean you can simply swan up here in your flip flops and have a magical time. Suitable footwear is an absolute must, along with a mountain jacket for the almost inevitable drizzle. More often than not the conditions will be perfect for a mountain stroll – but it is better to be prepared than soaked through.

Two cottage with red roofs in Durmitor national park, Montenegro. © Doin Oakenhelm / Alamy Stock Photo

Be respectful in the right areas

The larger towns of Montenegro are every bit as cosmopolitan and contemporary as anywhere else in the continent. Fashion is very important in this part of the world and don’t be surprised to see streets full of meticulously attired youngsters. Conservative society still exists, however, and it is important to keep in mind when visiting monasteries, churches and the rest.

Women planning on entering monasteries and mosques should bring a simple headscarf with them, and both sexes should be looking to cover themselves to at least the knee. Showing a little bit of arm is absolutely fine, but you won’t get very far if you’re trying to enter Ostrog with your thighs on show.

Montenegro is a very liberal society when it comes to aesthetics, and few will be bothered by the clothing decisions of others. Despite that, it is up to the visitor to make sure they have ticked all the boxes and aren’t running the risk of angering the few who will kick up a fuss. Follow our simple guide and a fantastic time will be had.

Monastery of Serbian Orthodox Church in Montenegro. © Ivan Kuznetsov / Alamy Stock Photo