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A display at the Museo di Castelvecchio | leonl/Flickr
A display at the Museo di Castelvecchio | leonl/Flickr
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The Best Museums in Verona, Italy

Picture of Ione Wang
Updated: 5 August 2017
As one of the centers of power in the Roman empire’s first period of expansion, Verona is an ancient city. Its long history lingers on in the city as a palimpsest of different cultural waves and influences: you’ll see Roman ruins next to medieval fortresses, with a Renaissance-era church in the background. All this history is collected and stored in the city’s many museums. There’s something for everyone, whether you’re an art lover, opera fan, technology enthusiast or history buff.
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Museo di Castelvecchio

A medieval castle plays host to the civic art collection, including all kinds of works by old masters as well as various historic goodies. The space is designed by modernist architect Carlo Scarpa, who imparts to the fortress his unique touch. In addition to all the paintings, sculptures, antique weaponry and ceramics, the place also boasts a stunning view of the river Adige. A stop not to be missed for lovers of Italian art.

Museo di Castelvecchio, Corso Castelvecchio, 2, 37121 Verona, Italy, +39 045 806 2611

More Scarpa…#museo #museodicastelvecchio #verona #carloscarpa #scarpa

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Museo della Radio

You may come to Verona for the wine, the art, or the romantic Northern Italian vibes, but you may be pleasantly surprised by this excellent private collection of old radios. The museum is dedicated to Guglielmo Marconi, an engineer, inventor and more, and is worth a visit for anyone with a liking for little curiosities and delightful old things, as well as history and science buffs.

Museo della Radio, Via del Pontiere, 40, 37122 Verona, Italy, +39 045 595855

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Museo Civico di Storia Naturale

A gorgeous 16th-century palace is the setting for an eclectic exhibition of natural history, including strange plants and bizarre fossils from near and far. Those who like a bit of weird and wonderful science will enjoy it, and it’s also a great place for kids.

Museo Civico di Storia Naturale, Palazzo Pompei, Lungadige Porta Vittoria, 9, 37129 Verona, Italy, +39 045 807 9400

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Arena Museo Opera & Palazzo Forti

A multimedia exhibition dedicated to Italy’s long history of opera culture has all kinds of treasures to discover. You’ll find scores and letters from composers like Puccini and Verdi, as well as set pieces, costumes and old photos from famous performances of the past. Palazzo Forti also hosts a private collection of 20th-century art and contemporary Italian art from artists like Felice Casorati and Vanessa Beecroft.

Arena Museo Opera, Palazzo Forti, Via Massalongo 7, Verona, Italy, +39 045 8030 461

#pablopicasso 🎨

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Museo Archeologico al Teatro Romano

Next to the ruins of the old Roman theater is a museum dedicated to all the ancient history of the city and the artifacts unearthed in and around Verona, such as mosaics, altars, and ceramics. Roman history buffs and lovers of ancient art will be delighted by this little museum.

Museo Archeologico al Teatro Romano, Rigaste Redentore, 2, 37129 Verona, Italy, +39 045 800 0360

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Fresco Museum and Juliet’s tomb

The former convent of San Francesco al Corso is now converted into a museum of medieval frescoes, and also designated as the final resting place of the timeless Shakespearean heroine of Romeo and Juliet. Between the 14th and 17th centuries, Verona was a city with a huge amount of frescoes in public spaces. The city had a great number of fragments from various buildings in storage, and they are gathered here in this museum. The oldest pieces here date back to the first century, but there’s also pieces from medieval, Renaissance and Baroque eras.

Juliet’s Tomb, Via Luigi da Porto, 1, 37122 Verona, Italy