The Best Markets To Shop at in Dublinairport_transferbarbathtubbusiness_facilitieschild_activitieschildcareconnecting_roomcribsfree_wifigymhot_tubinternetkitchennon_smokingpetpoolresturantski_in_outski_shuttleski_storagesmoking_areaspastar

The Best Markets To Shop at in Dublin

Head to Eatyard for first-class street food
Head to Eatyard for first-class street food | © Bodytonic
Whether you’re looking for antiques, artisanal jams or handmade crafts, or even if you aren’t quite sure just what you’re searching for yet, Dublin’s markets are filled with hidden treasures waiting to be discovered.

Set against seaside backdrops or under the roof of historic Victorian buildings, the venues of Dublin’s markets are as varied as the wares on offer. If you have a hankering for artisanal cheeses, organic produce bought straight from the farmers or Irish-made trinkets and jewellery, these are the city’s best markets to dive into.

Temple Bar Food Market

Market, Street Food
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Shop for bread and cake at Temple Bar Food Market
Shop for bread and cake at Temple Bar Food Market | © Chris Cooper-Smith / Alamy Stock Photo
Temple Bar Food Market has a colourful array of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Browse the stalls heaving with locally sourced produce, with traders on hand to provide expert knowledge on how best to cook, prepare and enjoy a wide range of dishes. Artisanal cheeses, olives, freshly made hummus and pesto are all on the menu, in addition to a selection of fresh oysters – in a city known for its seafood, these restaurants are must-visits. Many of the vendors will happily give you a few samples to try before purchase. The food market goes ahead come rain or shine, with the Meeting House Square providing shelter when needed.
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Eatyard

Market, Street Food
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A variety of vendors serve up takeaway-style food at Eatyard
A variety of vendors serve up takeaway-style food at Eatyard | © Bodytonic
Located in the colourful neighbourhood of Rathmines, Eatyard brings a vibrant new casual dining experience to Dublin. A variety of vendors serve up takeaway-style food in a relaxed environment at this permanent food marketplace, with benches to facilitate group gatherings. Choose from delectable dishes such as vegan fish and chips, cauliflower wings and stuffed Venezuelan arepas, with sweet churros to finish. One of the perks is that this stays open a little later than most markets, which means you can enjoy a range of craft beers from the Brewtonic Bar. Also keep an eye out for events from the associated Bakeyard and music festival.
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Farmleigh Food and Craft Market

Market, Street Food, Snacks
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Farmleigh Food and Craft Market takes place throughout the summer
Farmleigh Food and Craft Market takes place throughout the summer | © Farmleigh Food and Craft Market
Situated in the beautiful surroundings of Farmleigh Farmyard (behind Farmleigh House), right beside Phoenix Park, the atmosphere at the Food and Craft Market is one of a traditional marketplace. Take in the serenity of one of the largest parks in Europe before wandering through the stalls displaying award-winning cheeses, organic vegetables and freshly made treats. Couple your visit with one of the many interesting events going on at Farmleigh House, which range from discussions on beekeeping to photography exhibitions. The market takes place on individual dates throughout the summer, so be sure to check the schedule in advance to avoid missing the next event. There’s no ATM, so remember to bring cash.
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Howth Market

Market, Snacks, Street Food, Ice Cream
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Explore the treasures of Howth Market
Explore the treasures of Howth Market | © Howth Market
With five front units open seven days a week and over 25 stalls springing to life at the weekends, Howth Market is one of the focal points of this quaint seaside town and attracts locals just as much as those from further afield. Conveniently located beside the DART station, this market is perfect for browsing on a sunny day before heading along the cliff walk or onto the pier. Though the market sells a great mix of wares, from woodwork to antique jewellery, the food is the highlight. Buy a loaf of the enticing freshly baked bread from the village’s artisan bakers and try some of Howth’s only genuine home-made gelato from Amore.
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George’s Street Arcade

Market, Snacks, Street Food
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George’s Street Arcade has been in operation since the late 1800s
George’s Street Arcade has been in operation since the late 1800s | © Kevin George / Alamy Stock Photo
Serving Dublin since 1881, this enclosed Victorian market has a charming red-bricked interior housing over 50 stalls. Ranging in size and scale, the vendors here sell everything from authentic falafel to art, memorabilia and coin collections. They even offer tarot readings to help marketgoers divine what lies in their future – perhaps a freshly made cold-pressed juice from The Juicery, or a caffeine fix from Simon’s Place Coffee Shop? Striking a balance between market and shopping centre, you’re always sure to find something unique among George’s Street Arcade’s eclectic range of stalls and shopfronts.
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The People’s Park Market

Market, Snacks, Street Food
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The People’s Park Market is a firm favourite with Dubliners
The People’s Park Market is a firm favourite with Dubliners | © Peter Barritt / Alamy Stock Photo
This market is located within the historic People’s Park, which opened in 1890 and is home to stunning Victorian architecture, including a gate lodge and original tearooms. Though the market is a much newer addition, it has proven a firm favourite with Dubliners, offering a vast range of seasonal fruit and veg in addition to hot baked goods. McNally Family Farm can often be found here, selling organic vegetables and salad ingredients grown just north of Dublin. The park also hosts a number of outdoor concerts and events that coincide with the market throughout the year.
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Blackrock Market

Market
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Blackrock Market hosts over 50 traders
Blackrock Market hosts over 50 traders | © Blackrock Market
Originally a coaching inn, today Blackrock Market hosts over 50 traders and since its inception in 1996 has built up a reputation as one of the most popular markets in Dublin. Visitors can browse fine art, antique furnishings and handmade crafts; Hubert’s Bric-a-Brac in particular has a wide range of vintage finds of both Irish and European descent, including ceramics and pottery and vintage cameras from around the world. People come for the antiques and stay for the food; don’t miss the authentic Indian street food at 3 Leaves, an award-winning restaurant that dishes up pav bhaji (thick vegetable curry served with a roll) and pani puri (fried balls of hollow dough packed with savoury fillings such as chickpeas) to eager guests.
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The Green Door Market

Market, Snacks, Street Food
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Founded in 2014 by two couples, Deirdre O’Sullivan and Norman Kenny and Christy and Mary Stapleton, The Green Door Market is one of the largest and best farmer’s markets in Ireland. It relocated from its original home in Newmarket Square to Bluebell in 2018. This change brought Bluebell, once a thriving market and farming community up until the 1950s, back to its roots, and the market’s change of venue didn’t diminish its charm. Here, stalls selling eco-friendly dry goods such as home-made granola stand alongside those selling flowers, organic produce, olive oils and preserves, and local meats, including ethically produced free-range Irish salami from The Wooded Pig.
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Designer Mart at Cow’s Lane

Market, Snacks, Street Food
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The largest designer market in Dublin, the Designer Mart at Cow’s Lane sells a range of handmade rarities. For those looking for truly original pieces, the market has everything from prints, paintings and handcrafted hats to designer children’s toys, and there are often new stalls to discover, even if you’ve been before. If you’re seeking one-off dynamic finds, this is the place to discover bespoke pieces from independent Irish and Ireland-based designers. The stalls are usually staffed by the designers and makers themselves, so you can discuss the history and techniques that go into their craft.
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This article is an updated version of a story created by Kate Phelan.