Must-Visit Museums in Cork, Ireland

Cork's imaginative museums tell the fascinating story of the area and its relationship to broader Irish history
Cork's imaginative museums tell the fascinating story of the area and its relationship to broader Irish history | © David Ribeiro / Alamy Stock Photo
With an abundance of legendary pubs, it’s easy to get carried away in Cork’s lively drinking scene. But if you’re also thirsty to learn, Cork is just as big on culture as it is on nightlife. Ireland’s Rebel City has a long and explosive past, inextricably linked with Ireland’s fight for independence. Its imaginative museums tell this story from every angle: they tell it through art, through archaeology and through butter. Yes, butter. Who said learning had to be dry? Here’s our pick of Cork’s must-visit museums.

Cork Public Museum

Museum

This is the place to get your bearings on Cork’s story. Despite its modest looks, it covers an impressive expanse of Irish history – from medieval Cork through to WWI and Ireland’s struggle for independence. Its priceless relics span archaeology, political history, photography and more. You’ll find the museum in lush Fitzgerald Park, worth a visit in its own right, which is a 15-minute walk west of the city centre or a short ride on bus 208 from Patrick Street.

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Butter Museum

Museum
Surely a contender for the world’s most niche museum, this charming place might surprise you with its depth. It’s not just about butter. In fact, in its eclectic display, the story of butter is the story of the life – commercial, social and domestic – of Ireland. Who knew butter could teach us so much? The museum – which is rightly housed in an old dairy factory – is in hilly Shandon in the north of Cork. The entrance is €4 (£3.65) for adults and €1.50 (£1.35) for children.
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Cork City Gaol

Museum

If you’re after something edgier, you’ll find grit and gloom aplenty at Cork City Gaol. Though it closed a century ago, its air still feels heavy and prisoners’ names remain scratched into the walls. The museum roots the personal stories of its inmates – among them political prisoners – in a broad historical context. It is a sobering, emotional experience. The forbidding gaol building sits in swathes of green space, just a 30-minute walk from the city centre.

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Sun:
10:00 am - 4:30 pm
Mon:
10:00 am - 4:30 pm
Tue:
10:00 am - 4:30 pm
Wed:
10:00 am - 4:30 pm
Thu:
10:00 am - 4:30 pm
Fri:
10:00 am - 4:30 pm
Sat:
10:00 am - 4:30 pm

Lewis Glucksman Gallery

Art Gallery, Building, Museum, University
The main draw here is the gallery itself. This light-filled, airy monolith, which seems to hover among the trees, has won architectural awards too numerous to list. Inside, its three floors house an equally dazzling array of global contemporary art. They run frequent learning events for children, too – keep an eye on their website for details. The gallery is in the serene lower grounds of University College Cork, and is totally free to enter (although donations are welcome).
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Crawford Art Gallery

Art Gallery, Opera House
You’ll find much to discover at this leading gallery, which boasts both contemporary and classic masterpieces. Its permanent displays give an insight into subjects such as emigration and famine, and it has some of the city’s prize jewels in its midsts – among them the coveted Canova casts – classical plaster figures gifted to Cork from the Vatican two centuries ago. The Crawford Gallery is a 10-minute walk from Parnell Place Bus Station, and a 15-minute walk from Cork’s Kent Station. It’s free to enter and stays open late til 8pm on Thursdays.
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Sun:
11:00 am - 4:00 pm
Mon:
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Tue:
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Wed:
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Thu:
10:00 am - 8:00 pm
Fri:
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Sat:
10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Nano Nagle Place

Museum

Never heard of Nano Nagle? Make time to get to know one of Ireland’s most revered figures, who single-handedly transformed education for Cork’s poor. The museum, which includes gardens, archives and a tomb, is an inspiring tribute to this saint-like pioneer. Find Nano Nagle Place on Douglas Street, a five-minute walk from the English Market and St Patrick’s Street. Though entrance to the gardens is free, if you want the full Heritage Experience (and you do!), it’s €7.50 (£6.80) for adults and €4.50 (£4.10) for children.

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These recommendations were updated on July 2, 2020 to keep your travel plans fresh.