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© Robert L. Knudsen/WikiCommons
© Robert L. Knudsen/WikiCommons
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The History Of The Kennedys Museum In 1 Minute

Picture of Brienne Pierce
Updated: 27 October 2016
‘Ich bin ein Berliner’ was a phrase heard around the world, and it’s one that has remained in the hearts of many Germans. As John F. Kennedy was a beloved president across the pond, he was also a certain brand of human whose sympathies and insight gained him allowances into a special place for many living in or from Deutschland. This is probably why a museum here in Berlin stands to commemorate the outspoken and charismatic president.

During the time Germany was divided, there needed to be symbols of hope and optimism in high places to signify the possibility of a different and brighter future. For a divided Germany, this was John F. Kennedy. As Irish-Catholic immigrants who rose to the top, the Kennedys are as emblematic of the American dream as they come. But that’s not what the museum is about. It’s about immortalizing a person who stood for change in a tumultuous time. John Kennedy famously spoke against communism, but without disembodying Germans; his sympathies and firm outlook on a positive future led him to be a voice of encouragement.

It was important to have a talisman of hope to look onto during the Cold War, and John wasn’t willing to shy away from that. His tours to Germany during the Cold War were iconic. He gallantly voiced his pride for the freedom of the west and felt both humbled and uplifted in the wake of its liberty. The museum is celebrating its 10-year-anniversary this November and is a private museum. The collection features facets of the lives of the Kennedys: everything from photographs to private documents. The timeline of the museum covers the span of his whole life, from the time of his family’s emigration from Ireland to the famous speech in 1963. Located at Auguststraße 11-13, in Mitte, it’s in the area of other important museums, highlighting John F. Kennedy’s importance to Germany. The fascination of the Kennedys continues.

Monday-Friday 10 am-6 pm; Saturday-Sunday 11 am-6 pm