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Best Markets to Visit in Germany

Picture of Evelyn Smallwood
Updated: 7 June 2017
One of the best ways to learn about what people in a different culture value is to see what they throw away. Rather than dumpster diving, go instead to one of Germany’s many flea markets. Learn about cultural history through household items, and just maybe find a little something special to take back home. Here are seven excellent markets, starting in Berlin and moving clockwise around the country.
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Arkonaplatz, Berlin

The Arkonaplatz flea market is a bit of an oasis in the middle of the city, surrounded as it is by green spaces and Linden trees. It’s been selling secondhand goods for more than 100 years, and these days is known for everything from the usual clothes, jewelry and shoes, to modern art and photographs of Berlin. Fans of D.D.R. chic will find something worth making room for in their suitcase.

Flea Market Arkonaplatz, Arkonapl., Berlin, Germany

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Fehrbellinerplatz, Berlin

Art lovers and flea market fans both love the Fehrbellinerplatz market in Wilmersdorf. It’s on the outskirts of town, but still easily reachable by public transport. The sale of new items is forbidden by the market management, so Fehrbellinerplatz is a great spot to find a hidden treasure among the art and antiques on offer. There are also some stands selling clothing, furniture, and junk/jumble sale stuff.

Kunst- & Trödelmarkt Fehrbelliner Platz, Fehrbelliner Pl. 8, Berlin, Germany

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Alte Messe, Leipzig

A good mix of professional sellers and private people make the Alte Messe in Leipzig an incredibly versatile market, known for its high quality and rare finds. Whether you’re looking for old postcards, dolls and toys, vintage jewelry, accessories or collectibles, it’s all here on the first Sunday of every month. If your suitcase is big enough, you might just find that perfect bit of furniture your room has been waiting for.

Alte Messe (Old Fair) Leipzig, Deutscher Pl. 4, Leipzig, Germany

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Trabrennbahn Daglfing, Munich

With a mix of indoor and outdoor space, the Trabrennbahn Daglfing market is a good choice no matter what the weather. The vibe is something like a giant garage sale that is open every Friday and Saturday. Outdoor vendors offer prams, clothes, toys, and things for the home and garden, while indoor vendors offer antiques and quality vintage pieces.

Trabrennbahn München-Daglfing, Rennbahnstraße 35, München, Germany

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Flohmarkt auf der Theresienwiese, Munich

This market is only held once a year on the first Saturday of Munich’s Spring Festival, but for flea market enthusiasts, it’s well worth the wait. More than 2,000 vendors attract 80,000 visitors all looking for a bargain. The market officially opens at 6 a.m., but it is possible to go the day before and have a look around before the crowds descend.

Theresienwiese, Theresienwiese, Bavariaring, München, Germany

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Trödel & Antikmarkt am Aachenerplatz, Düsseldorf

Running every week since 1976, the Trödel & Antikmarkt am Aachenerplatz accommodates more than 600 dealers in over 215,000 square feet (20,000 square meters). Management is careful to make sure vendors offer legitimate vintage goods and antiques instead of second hand junk. Even if €5,000 secretaires are not on your shopping list, if you’re at the market in summer, it’s worth taking a look around the antiques tent – it’s the only part of the market that’s air-conditioned.

Trödel & Antikmarkt am Aachenerplatz, Aachener Platz, Düsseldorf, Germany

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Flohschanze Flohmarkt, Hamburg

Every Saturday between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. in the Schanzenviertel in Hamburg, punters gather at the former cattle slaughter halls to search for the very best vintage treasures. The vendors are mostly private sellers and new products are prohibited. At 13,000 square feet (1,200 square meters), the market is big enough to have a good variety, but not so large as to be exhausting. Better deals are found earlier in the day, so it is a good idea to arrive early and then spend the afternoon having some cake at one of the Schnazenviertels many cafés.

Flohschanze Flohmarkt, Neuer Kamp 30, Hamburg, Germany