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Rollercoaster I © Paulbr75/Pixabay
Rollercoaster I © Paulbr75/Pixabay

11 Things You Can Do With Kids in Germany

Picture of Evelyn Smallwood
Updated: 3 July 2017
While Germany is pretty kid-friendly – meaning in theory, there’s very little you can’t do with children here – sometimes it’s good to plan beyond a visit to the playground. If you’re looking for inspiration, here are 11 things to do when visiting with little ones.

Eat a real restaurant

As long as they’re not recreating a Nascar race inside, children are generally welcome in German restaurants (on a separate note, so are dogs). High chairs are commonly found even in fancier places, and while less formal restaurants such as pub or cafés may offer special menus for children, in general, German children eat what their parents do. Look out for Bratwurst (sausage), Pommes (French fries), Nudeln mit Tomatensosse (pasta and tomato sauce) or Spätzle, a sort of German mac and cheese, or Maultaschen (literally ‘mouth pockets’, aka ravioli).

Hofbräuhaus in Munich I
Hofbräuhaus in Munich I | © | Jorge Royan

Get a family ticket

Almost anything that you can do with children in Germany can be done on a family ticket, including riding on public transport. The general offer is two adults and up to three children on the same ticket, but of course, details vary from place to place. Museums, monuments and attractions are often free to anyone under 18 and always for children under 5.

Hotels as well often offer special discounts for children or don’t charge for extra bedding as long as it is used in the same room as the parents. Be sure to ask at the desk if there is a Gästekarte (guest card) available, and take advantage of free local transport and entry to local attractions

Explore nature

Germans love the great outdoors, and they love nothing better than taking their children with them on all but the steepest of Alpine walks. If a bracing hike deep into the woods in search of a forest pub is a bit too much of an ask, search online before your visit for ‘animal spotting safaris’ or ‘nature walks’ scaled for little legs. Geocaching is also reasonably popular even among adults. There are forest and parks either right in the middle of or very close to major cities, all accessible by public transportation.

Head outside for some family time I