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View on Tour Montparnasse and Les Invalides, Paris © S.Borisov / Shutterstock
View on Tour Montparnasse and Les Invalides, Paris © S.Borisov / Shutterstock
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Makeover Due for Paris' Most Hated Monument

Picture of Jade Cuttle
Updated: 23 September 2017
Montparnasse Tower is often perceived as an unwelcome intrusion to the Parisian skyline, but it’s the best place to catch a panoramic view. Its epic sky-scraper structure is now set to undergo a large-scale renovation, making it more attractive and eco-friendly in time for the 2024 Olympic games.

The epic structure towers over Paris at a height of 210 metres, with no less than 58 floors to climb for anyone brave enough to head to the top. It is set to undergo a €300 million renovation aiming to make the monument both “more aesthetic and more green”. The works begin in 2019 and will take place of over a period of 40 months, hoping to be completed in 2023.

View on Tour Montparnasse and Les Invalides, Paris
View on Tour Montparnasse and Les Invalides, Paris | © S.Borisov / Shutterstock

The announcement of an eco-friendly renovation has mostly been received as cause for joy, though not for everybody. There’s been talks ongoing since 2014 about simply destroying this building, with the structure sometimes being dubbed as the city’s ‘most ugly monument’, towering its opaque black mass across a Paris skyline it doesn’t quite fit into.

However, with the new changes there’ll be cosy winter gardens and a bio-climatic transparent exterior facade, creating a gorgeous déluge of natural light inside. The modernising focus works in line with eco-friendly interests and sustainability, promising to cut energy costs to 10 times below its current consumption.

Tour Montparnasse │
Tour Montparnasse │ | © Juanedc/Flickr

The plans also come in a bid to encourage more people to visit this monument, a move no doubt inspired by the 2024 Olympic Games that will take place in Paris.