A Tour of Iconic Filming Locations for 'Amélie' in Montmartre

Caroline Peyronel
Caroline Peyronel | © Culture Trip
Photo of Jade Cuttle
1 February 2018

Amélie (2001) is the French romantic comedy film that made those who were not already in love with Paris fall in love with this charming city. Set in the picturesque neighbourhood of Montmartre, it’s still possible to follow her footsteps and delve into her dreamy world – if you know where to look.

Café des Deux Moulins

Brasserie, Cafe, French, $$$
Map View
Caroline Peyronel
Caroline Peyronel | © Culture Trip
If you only have time to visit one place, then this is the gem to go for. This cafe remains almost exactly as it was in the film, except for the tobacco shop with the crazed hypochondriacal co-worker Georgette. It is the spot where the first rendezvous is arranged with Nino, Amélie’s love interest, but romance is not quite on the cards yet as Amélie panics and pretends to someone else. Be sure to order a helping of Amélie’s now world-famous crème brûlée while there to truly step into her universe.

Maison Collignon

Grocery Store, French
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Caroline Peyronel
Caroline Peyronel | © Culture Trip
In local-lingo, Maison Collignon is just called Chez Ali after its owner. Ali wanted to keep the signs from the film above his real-life grocers since Amélie’s apartment was located just over the store. In the film, Amélie avenges the nasty greengrocer by sneaking into his apartment and fiddling around mischievously until he no longer abuses his adorable assistant Lucien, who then takes charge of the grocery store with delight. Those keen to go away with an Amélie souvenir, stop by this place as there’s a great selection for sale alongside his fruit and veg.

Studio 28

Cinema, Movie Theater, Theater
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Caroline Peyronel
Caroline Peyronel | © Culture Trip
This location boasts the title of being one of Paris’ oldest picture houses. Not only was it featured in Amélie’s cinema scene but it is also one of Montmartre’s last remaining hidden gems. It’s one of the lesser-visited film locations—compared with the Café des 2 Moulins that are always bustling with fans—and offers a more authentic Parisian experience that goes off the beaten tourist path. There’s only one screen, but a charming and cute café waits nearby to round off the film viewing nicely.

Abbesses Station (Place des Abbesses)

Market, Building
Map View
kctp0015-peyronel-paris-montmartre-abbesses-station-2
Caroline Peyronel / | © Culture Trip

There’s a certain spark of magic while whizzing through the Abbesses Metro Station and realise it’s from the film. It’s the station next to the carousel where Amélie kindly assists the blind man and rekindles his passion for life, detailing all the delights he can’t see. Whilst the real station used for this scene was Porte des Lilas, the small and charming square of Place des Abbesses features heavily throughout the film as ardent fans will be quick to point out.

Sacré-Cœur

Building, Church, Park
Map View
Sacre Coeur, Paris.
© Janet Ridley / Alamy Stock Photo
It’s impossible to embark on a tour of Amélie filming locations without posing for an iconic shot by the Sacré-Coeur. In the most playful scenes of the movie, Amélie gives another rendezvous to Nino by a phone box at the bottom of Montmartre. She concocts a treasure hunt for retrieving his book of photos where he has to climb all the 222 stairs to the top of Sacré-Coeur following blue arrows before having to race all the way back down. Not only is the view simply stunning in this spot, leaning right across the city, but it’s also full of street artists doing incredible football tricks and a hilarious mime artist reaping havoc with the traffic. As well as the carousel and phone box, look out for the telescope from the film.

Lamarck-Caulaincourt

Market
Map View
Amélie describes this stunning metro station on line 12 with the double split staircase going up the hill of Montmartre and the breathtaking wonders of the market on Rue Lamarck to a blind man who can’t see it for himself. It’s a great starting point for a stint of flaneur à la française: aimlessly wandering just for the fun of it in a chic corner of one of the most beautiful spots in Paris. The station opened in 1912.