airport_transferbarbathtubbusiness_facilitieschild_activitieschildcareconnecting_roomcribsfree_wifigymhot_tubinternetkitchennon_smokingpetpoolresturantski_in_outski_shuttleski_storagesmoking_areaspastar
Sign In
Sections
Follow Us
St Tropez is a wonderful place for solo travellers | © Matthias Rhomberg/Flickr
St Tropez is a wonderful place for solo travellers | © Matthias Rhomberg/Flickr
Unsaved itemCreated with Sketch.

A Solo Traveller's Guide to St Tropez

Picture of Alex Ledsom
Updated: 30 April 2017
St Tropez is a great destination for people travelling on their own. Here’s our guide on where to go and what to do for the independent traveller.

St Tropez has a very small town centre so you can walk everywhere. For some of the more famous beaches, you’ll need a car – they’re a short drive away.

What To See and Do

The beaches and coastal walks are outstanding. They are wild and rugged so take appropriate footwear if you plan to take any long walks, other than from the car to the sand. Visit the Cap Camarat lighthouse and walk the coastal path down to the Bonne Terrasse beach and have a picnic. Or walk around the headland at Pointe de la Rabiou, and end at the restaurant Les Salins for a drink or a pizza. Alternatively walk the length of Pampelonne beach, which is made up of Tahiti Beach and Nikki Beach too. Tahiti Beach is a “clothing optional” beach.

#pointedelarabiou #sentierdulittoral #sttropez #weekend

A post shared by JULIA GAUTIER (@julia_gautier) on

Alternatively, head to one of four museums in town. The Butterfly House has over 35,000 species of butterflies (both native and exotic) and the Museum of Police and Cinema is in the old police station and explains the town’s long history with movies. St Tropez has been used as a backdrop to a number of films and was where many of the players in France’s New Wave of cinema used to hang out. Brigitte Bardot still keeps a house nearby.

The Citadel houses the Museum of Maritime History in the old dungeons (which have had protected status since 1921) and offers amazing photo opportunities. The Citadel is also a great place just to hang out and read. The Musée de l’Annonciade is an old converted chapel from the early 16th century. It used to be home to Penitent monks but now is home to lots of lovely artwork, many of the local area painted by Paul Signac in the late 19th century when he first arrived.

#maisondespapillons #beauxarts #sainttropez

A post shared by Ary Corouge (@arycorouge) on

Where To Eat

Eat at Café des Arts, which is off the beaten track and very friendly. They have a nice little terrace for the summer months and are open all day long. Or try El Mas, which is another little restaurant, run by a husband and wife, who do great tapas dishes with an emphasis on seafood.

If you don’t want to take a table by yourself, head to one of the beach restaurants, where you can eat from your sun lounger. People love La Bouillabaisse on Bouillabaisse Beach, which is on one of the few town beaches. Or head to one of the beach restaurants out of town, like L’Esquinade Plage on Pampelonne Beach or Bagatelle Beach on Nikki Beach (a short walk south).

Where To Stay

There are some wonderful small hotels in St Tropez. Hotel Ponche is a 22-room boutique hotel with lovely views over the old fishing quarter, La Ponche. Alternatively, sleep directly on the beach at one of the oldest beach clubs, Tahiti Beach. It opened in the 1950s. Both should offer the opportunity for a more intimate type of accommodation and the chance to either meet people in relaxed surroundings or just to do your own thing.