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© Patrick Fore / Unsplash
© Patrick Fore / Unsplash
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Would You Eat This Finnish Bread Made From Crushed Crickets?

Picture of India Irving
Social Media Editor
Updated: 24 November 2017
A bakery in Finland is working to combat world hunger with a specially formulated bread made from protein-rich crushed crickets.

Fazer Bakery, who is behind the movement launching November 25, says they are the first bakers to experiment with such a product.

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Production Process of Bread | © Chmee2/WikiCommons

Each individual loaf is made from around 70 crickets, which are dried, ground and combined with flour, wheat and healthful seeds. The ingredients make the bread a much higher source of protein that your standard wheat or white loaf.

Insects are extremely high in protein, with at least 2 billion people consuming them globally. As they are widely available, they are a sustainable source of nutrition, so much so that in 2013 the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) launched a campaign to push for the breeding of various species for consumption.

In early November, Finland lifted their governmental ban on selling insects raised for food consumption, which gave Fazer the official go-ahead to commence their bread campaign.

The UK, the Netherlands, Belgium, Austria and Denmark also allow insects to be marketed and sold as food, so it will be interesting to see if they follow suit with a similar concept to Fazer’s innovative loaves.