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Råbjerg Mile
Råbjerg Mile | © Nicolas Makropoulos / Flickr
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11 Places in Denmark That Are Super Hard to Get To but Well Worth the Effort

Picture of Aliki Seferou
Updated: 22 December 2017
There are many places in Denmark worth exploring, but getting there isn’t always easy. If you don’t mind spending some time on the road (or hiking) and want to see the country’s diverse landscape—with sandy beaches, breathtaking dunes and dense forests—keep reading, because we’ve rounded up the best hardest places to get to in Denmark.
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Wadden Sea-National Park Vadehavet

The Wadden Sea National Park is the largest national park in Denmark and, since 2014, has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The breathtaking park is known not only for its diverse nature—with millions of migratory birds passing through every year and over 500 species of plants and animals—but also for the oyster safari that takes place here throughout the year.

Nationalpark Vadehavet, Havnebyvej 30, Rømø, Denmark, +45 72 54 36 34

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National Park Thy

Dunes, dune heaths, 200 lakes, birds, deer and many more animals and plants comprise the unique landscape at Thy National Park. Many locals and tourists head to this breathtaking national park every year for horse riding, fishing, mountain biking and other activities.

Nationalpark Thy, Stenbjerg Landingsplads 4, Snedsted, Denmark, +45 72 54 15 00

National Park Thy | © Mette Johnsen, courtesy of National Park Thy

Grenen

Skagen is located on the northernmost part of Denmark where the North Sea and the Baltic Sea meet. Due to the different density of these two bodies of water, their tides never merge, creating an astonishing sight. Every year, millions of tourists head to this northern city to witness this unique phenomenon, and to spend a few days in the diverse landscape of Skagen.

Råbjerg Mile

Being the largest migrating dune in Northern Europe, Råbjerg Mile is definitely worth the time and effort for a visit. It’s located close to Skagen, the northernmost city of Denmark, and is one of the most popular attractions for hiking enthusiasts and thrill-seekers. Hills over 40 meters (130 feet) high and endless miles of sand comprise the breathtaking scenery that many have compared to desert landscapes.

Råbjerg Mile
Råbjerg Mile | © Peter Leth / Flickr
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Hirtshals Vendsyssel-Thy Island

Nature-lovers and fitness enthusiasts shouldn’t miss a trip to Hirtshals, the little town on Vendsyssel-Thy Island. It’s located on the northern part of Denmark on the Skagerrak strait. Aside for its sandy beaches, Hirtshals is also known for its vast forests and high hills.

Hirtshals, Denmark

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Ribe

Ribe is the oldest city in Scandinavia and it is said to have been founded in the 8th century. Those who want to trace the Vikings‘ steps should definitely pass by this small medieval town in southwest Jutland. Take a stroll through the narrow, scenic alleys and pay a visit to the Cathedral, which is the first Christian church built in Denmark.

Ribe, Denmark

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Ribe | © JERRYE & ROY KLOTZ MD / Wkimedia Commons | Ribe © JERRYE & ROY KLOTZ MD / Wkimedia Commons

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Ærøskøbing

With its small colorful houses and cobblestone streets, Ærøskøbing is considered one of the most picturesque cities in Denmark. Some of the oldest houses date back to the middle of the 17th century and the whole city is built in such a way that it preserves the atmosphere of old days.

Ærøskøbing, Denmark

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Ærøskøbing | © César González Palomo / Flickr | © César González Palomo / Flickr

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Bovbjerg

Bovbjerg is situated at the western part of Jutland. This small village is known for its wild landscape and a lighthouse that dates back to 1877, still standing at the edge of a hill right next to the North Sea. The section that once used to be the lighthouse keeper’s living room has been transformed into a cozy café, where visitors can grab a drink and enjoy the great view.

Bovbjerg Lighthouse, Fyrvej, Lemvig 27, Denmark

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Limfjord Denmark | © Simon Bierwald / Flickr | © Simon Bierwald / Flickr

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