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© Milan.sk/Wikimedia Commons
© Milan.sk/Wikimedia Commons
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12 Manneken Pis Outfits That Will Make You Smile

Picture of Nana Van De Poel
Updated: 5 January 2017
With over 900 custom-made outfits in his wardrobe, from both foreign and local organizations, Manneken Pis is the best-dressed statue this side of the Atlantic. Brussels makes sure that the world’s most famous peeing toddler is dressed the part for any occasion. Here are 12 of the quirky results.

The Jazz Cat

Ready to deliver some soulful tunes as soon as he’s done having a wee. This costume brought the Manneken together with another Belgian great: saxophone inventor Adolphe Sax.

The Subsued Clown

No, the nose wasn’t part of a whole clown outfit that mysteriously went missing. Manneken Pis was one of many statues across the world that donned a red nose for 2014’s Children’s Rights Day. For their ‘1000 Red Noses’ operation, the organization Clowns and Magicians Without Borders managed to put flashy noses on iconic sculptures in Brussels, Paris, Dublin, Helsinki, München, Adelaide, New York, and a bunch of other metropolises.

public domain/Pixabay
public domain/Pixabay | Public Domain/Pixabay

The Masked Casanova

When you walk by the Manneken’s basin and find him dressed like the suave Italian ladies’ man, you know that the Marolles‘ Venetian carnival is in town again.

The King Of Rock ‘n Roll

Elvis was spotted alive and well in the heart of Europe on the 19th anniversary of his death (1999) and once again in 2011, the year when Belgium was the country of honor at the Memphis in May International Festival.

Nothing But Net

Manneken Pis as a Lithuanian basketball player, neatly aiming his squirt through the hoop. The Lithuanians have even provided the boy with tiny sneakers.

The Gentleman

The Manneken is at his most dashing when playing Mr. Beulemans, a character from the Belgian play Le Mariage de Mademoiselle Beulemans (The Wedding of Miss Beulemans). In a top hat and tails, the peeing boy honors the birthday of Léopold Courouble, the Brussels writer who formed the inspiration for the successful 20th-century comedy.

Beach Patrol

For five glorious weeks during the summer, the Brussels canal becomes home to a stretched-out urban beach, complete with palm trees and boat parties. It’s the perfect opportunity for the Manneken to strut his stuff in his blue bathing suit while keeping safety in mind at all times – hence the buoy.

Courtesy of visit.brussels.be
Courtesy of visit.brussels.be

Into The Deep

When he feels like venturing further down into the ocean, the Manneken opts for his scuba suit, donated to him in 2007 by LIFRAS (a Brussels’ diving association) for the club’s 50th anniversary.

Manneken ‘Peace’

World Peace Day, September 21st, is when Manneken Pis becomes Manneken Peace. Being a big fan of democracy as well, his smileys and ‘go vote’ patches encourage one and all to exercise their civil rights.

The Bolivian Devil

Except for his strong little stream, there’s not much left to see of the Manneken when he helps celebrate the Bolivian Carnival of Oruro. Though he can’t exactly join in the traditional dance (known as the diablada) while doing his business, he’s always happy to rock the horned mask and flashy devil costume.

Uncle Sam

The Fourth of July has seen Manneken Pis in his Uncle Sam costume for quite a few years now. But will his ‘Yes, we can’ hat get to stay this year or will it be replaced by a red cap with a somewhat less enthusiastic message?

Spreading Holiday Cheer

Brussels embraces Christmas with open arms every year (just think of the Winter Wonders market), and the Manneken contributes to the cheer by becoming the city’s only Santa to pee in public.

Head to Brussels City Museum on the Grand Place for a glance at a hundred more of the Manneken’s unique costumes, including the gift that started it all: a rich blue coat and feather plume hat, donated by the Bavarian Elector at the end of the 17th century.