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© Andres Cristaldo/Epa/REX/Shutterstock
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Japan's Princess Mako Gives up the Royal Life for Love

Picture of Luke Abrahams
Social Content Editor
Updated: 18 July 2017
Princess Mako, the eldest daughter of Prince Akishino and granddaughter of Emperor Akihito, has renounced her royal status to marry the man she loves.

Whilst it may sound a little bit like the abdication crisis of 1943 (remember when Edward VIII gave up kingship to marry Wallace Simpson), there’s far less drama involved.

© Gustavo Amador/Epa/REX/Shutterstock

Of course, thousands of girls dream of being a princess and living a life of royalty – if their dreams were made reality, how many could then give their tiara up for love?

Princess Mako of Japan seems to think she can.

CNN reports that the Imperial Household of Japan say plans for the Princess to marry Kei Komuro – a graduate student who works at a law firm – are currently underway.

So how did this all come to be? Both met while studying abroad at an event inside a restaurant in the Shibuya district of Tokyo. Since meeting, the pair have seen each other numerous times a month – Mako even introduced him to her parents!

As part of Japanese royal family tradition, nuptials are extremely ritualised, so be warned, the couple will take oodles of time planning their big day before it’s officially announced on July 8. After this, a wedding date will be set, which will then be formally reported to the emperor and empress of Japan.

© Andres Cristaldo/Epa/REX/Shutterstock

If all goes ahead, Mako will lose all of her royal privileges and will be considered a commoner. The chances of her ever becoming empress were always slim, though. To ascend the Chrysanthemum Throne, you have to be of male descent. Sounds harsh, but that’s just the way things are.

In terms of succession, Mako’s uncle, Crown Prince Naruhito, is expected to succeed Emperor Akihito.

You may think the princess a little mad for abandoning such a life, but rest assured, she isn’t the first Japanese royal to give up the duty, fame, glitz and glamour of the job. Mako’s aunt, Sayako, also gave up royaldom back in 2005 when she married town planner Yoshiki Kuroda.

Want more royal news? Prince George has the cutest nickname for The Queen!