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Fondue | © Efraimstochter/pixabay
Fondue | © Efraimstochter/pixabay
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11 Awesome Dishes You Need to Try on Your Next Ski Trip

Picture of Lucy Pierce
Updated: 27 September 2017
In the mountains you will find the cuisine a little different, but just as mouth-watering, with a wide variety of cured meats, mountain cheeses, local wines, and rather sharp liquors. You won’t be short of places to wine and dine on your next ski trip, so why not try some of these typical alpine dishes.

Charcuterie

Du pain, du vin, et du boursin are the ingredients for a perfect soirée, so why not opt for the full charcuterie board, a very common starter in the Alps, with local smoked meat and cheeses, perfectly accompanied by local wines.

Raclette

The most famous dish from the mountains, served with cured meat, potatoes, gherkins, pickled onions, and a side salad. The Raclette cheese is sometimes served as half a wheel, where you can melt it on its side and scrape it off as it softens. A perfect treat after a day’s skiing. When in the mountains, you may as well indulge!

Tartiflette

Another recipe typical of the Savoy region in the French Alps. It is a simple one to make, consisting of potatoes, Reblochon cheese, lardons, and onions in a pie type dish. Another similar dish is croziflette, the only substitution is local pasta crozets in place of the potato.

Tartiflette with charcuterie
Tartiflette with charcuterie | © Aaron May/flickr

Fondue savoyarde

A meal to warm one up and to be shared among friends, cheese fondue is made with local cheeses, garlic, and a rather generous splash of white wine. It is then served with chunks of bread, or if you’d rather, potatoes.

Fondue bourguignonne

This dish translates to meat fondue, and the idea is that you cook your raw chunks of meat in boiling hot oil. It is then served with a number of sauces. Originally from Switzerland, it was invented in 1948 by Georges Esenwein who worked in a Lausanne restaurant.

Meat Fondue
Meat Fondue | © tmizo/flickr

Rösti

This Swiss dish is a little like hash browns, the potatoes are grated, then made into a fritter. Many Swiss consider this to be their national dish: some may have it for breakfast, while others will have it as a side to a main meal.

Diots

Diots are savoyarde sausages, and typically they are cooked with either red or white wine and served with potatoes, crozets, or polenta. When they are eaten cold, they are covered in spicy mustard, eaten with a salad, or placed in a sandwich.

Diots with crozets
Diots with crozets | © Matt Squirrell/Flickr

Gröstl

Through refusing to throw away leftovers came this typical Tirolean dish, composed of fried pork, buttery potatoes, and onions, dusted with paprika, cumin, and caraway seeds, while some opt to pop a fried egg on top. This is a great filling meal to have on the mountain that’ll keep you energized for your afternoon skiing, it can also be a good plate to share. You will find this in the Austrian Tyrol, as well as Southern Tyrol in Italy.

Schnitzel

Thinly sliced veal or pork that has been pounded to make it thiner, it is then fried in either oil or fat, and then the layer of flour, breadcrumbs, and beaten eggs is added. Schnitzel can be enjoyed with potato salad, or potatoes with parsley.

Schnitzel
Schnitzel | © tripb/flickr

Polenta

This is an Italian staple. Found most commonly in the north of Italy and in the mountains, it is made from maize (corn) flour and can be served in a number of different variations, from hot to cold, pureed or runny, or even hard and cut into pieces, much like a cake. One of the most basic dishes is served with the local fontina cheese, but it is also used as a side to many meat dishes.

Carbonade

This dish is a very popular mountain meal: it’s hearty, warming and will give you plenty of energy for your afternoon ski, as well as line your stomach before après. This beef stew is made with salt-preserved beef, onions, and red wine, and is usually served with polenta, potatoes, or chips.