Explore your world
Beach near El Nido, Palawan | © Richard Liblanc / Flickr
Beach near El Nido, Palawan | © Richard Liblanc / Flickr

11 Amazing Reasons To Visit Palawan, Philippines

Picture of Katrina Escalona
Updated: 14 February 2018

You’ve probably seen the photos of sparkling azure waters, towering limestone formations, and white-sand beaches – the image of paradise. This is Palawan. But if you still need a nudge to finally book that trip, here’s eleven.

It’s the best island in the world

Don’t just take our word for it. Take it from Travel + Leisure and their trusty community of globetrotters who have voted Palawan the “World’s Best Island” for two straight years. In the 2017 ranking, close runners-up were islands like Boracay, Santorini, and Bali. Read on and see why Palawan takes the cake.


Child running to sea in El Nido, Palawan | © Allan Ascaño / Flickr

Gorgeous beaches left and right

You could stay a month in Palawan and you’d still be left with a long list of beaches to tick off. Its capital city of Puerto Princesa has beaches nearby that locals frequent such as Nagtabon and the islets of Honda Bay. Drive north towards El Nido and you could beach hop along the way. Drive south towards Balabac and you’d still be able to do the same. Because the island is a long narrow stretch, wherever you end up, you’re never really too far from the coast. It’s any beach lover’s heaven on earth.

Beach in Coron, Palawan | © Ming-Yueh Wang / Flickr

Breathtaking views

Those photos you’ve seen on travel websites or your Instagram explore page are not filter-saved, too-good-to-be-true pictures — that’s actually how beautiful the island is. Yes, you can kayak on crystal clear waters before karst landscapes; yes, you can dive shipwrecks and swim next to turtles; and yes, those are the actual colors of the sky at sunset. The views you’ll witness on a trip to Palawan are of the kind that will make you pinch yourself and ever so slightly consider chucking your ticket home.


Man and woman kayaking in El Nido’s Small Lagoon | © Fabio Achilli / Flickr

It’s home to a “Wonder of Nature”

Less than an hour drive from the capital city proper is the Puerto Princesa Underground River. In 2012, this national park was officially included in the list of the World’s New Seven Wonders of Nature for its impressive natural make-up. The underground river, which is considered one of the longest in the world, is entered through a cave and explored aboard a paddle boat. The cave is made up of remarkable stalactite and stalagmite formations and has recently been discovered to be housing small waterfalls as well. Tourists can visit the park through a boat ride from the port of Sabang or a jungle hiking trail beginning from Sabang Beach.


Puerto Princesa Underground River | © Paweesit / Flickr

It’s the perfect chance to disconnect

As tempting as it sometimes is to post envy-worthy updates on all your social media accounts in a place as beautiful as Palawan, it’s also a place that invites you to disconnect from such distractions. It encourages you to focus on the place and moment. Instead of spending a half hour editing that Instagram photo and watching the favorites roll in, what’s even more worthwhile is chatting with the locals, renting a scooter and driving off to a secret beach, laying on a hammock by the sea, book in hand. This is where genuine moments and real life become even more picture-perfect than the uploads on your feed.

Relaxing by the sea in El Nido | © Allan Ascaño / Flickr

Diving and snorkel spots

Here’s some news you’ll love: Palawan’s sights under the sea are just as stunning as those above. Leisure snorkelers will enjoy having schools of fish swim around them in the waters of many Palawan beaches but the island includes truly unique underwater sights as well, like the war wrecks found in Coron. Palawan is also a jumping-off point to the Tubbataha Reefs, a site with among the most remarkable marine biodiversities in the world. It’s quite a long trip to the reefs and divers’ only option is to visit via live-aboard boats, so prior arrangements are necessary.

Turtle in the Tubbataha Reefs | © Jayvee Fernandez / Flickr

Fresh, affordable seafood

In Palawan, visitors can feast like high rollers and enjoy meals of rock lobster, prawns, and crabs daily, for cheap. Many island hopping tours, in places like El Nido and Coron especially, will already have this taken care of by the tour company. In the middle of the day, on your chartered boat or an island you’ve chosen to dock on for lunch, the crew will lay a delicious spread of grilled seafood and rice. Some restaurants, like K’na Boyet in the city Baywalk, also specialize in a “select-and-cook” type of dining experience where customers can handpick their meal from the fresh seafood laid out up front and have it cooked to their liking. If you’re interested in grilling up some of your own on a regular day, pay a visit to the palengke, or the local wet market, and browse through the morning’s fresh catch.


Crab cooked in coconut milk | | © currystrumpet / Flickr

Off-the-beaten-path destinations

Despite hordes of tourists having discovered this paradise of an island in recent years, it still has a lot of hidden gems for those who enjoy veering from the typical tourist route. While El Nido and Coron can get dizzyingly busy, many places near Puerto Princesa are still left tourist-free. For a change of scene, turn a beach day into a hiking day and hit up one of the many mountains on the island. Quite a few hiking trails near the city lead up to waterfalls so you can be sure to have something refreshing awaiting at the end of a trek.


Olangoan Falls, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan | © Katrina Escalona


As beautiful as the tourist favorites of Palawan are, sometimes sharing a place with too many people can take away a bit of its charm. Those in search of beaches on the down low should check out the beaches of San Vicente, or the islands of Port Barton. These fishing villages are lesser known to tourists and will give you more chances of solitude and getting to know the locals and local culture. For beaches that are at their rawest, purest form, venture south to the islands of Balabac where commercialization and tourism have yet to leave their traces.


White Beach, Port Barton | © Fabio Achilli / Flickr

It’s backpacker friendly

Being a Southeast Asian country, the Philippines and its neighbors are known to be relatively cheap for most tourists. So Palawan is perfect for backpackers who love the rustic experience of renting a small nipa hut by the sea or even a trusty hammock for accommodations and eating at a carinderia (a small, affordable eatery) with the town locals for meals. Though the tours in popular destinations like Coron and El Nido may set you back a bit, other daily expenses will always have simple and cheap alternatives for the traveller on a budget.


Sign to backpacker accommodations in Coron | © ArthurNielsen / Flickr

But if luxury is what you seek…

While perfect for backpackers, Palawan can also be the epitome of a luxurious tropical escape. There are several high-end havens on the island such as El Nido’s island resorts of Lagen, Pangalusian, and Miniloc. But if you’re really going big, you might be more interested in a hideaway that has catered to Hollywood A-listers such as Tom Cruise, Mariah Carey, and Robert de Niro. Though technically still belonging to the Palawan province, the exclusive resort of Amanpulo is found on Pamalican Island, just northeast of mainland Palawan.

In exchange for the hefty price tag, this resort provides its guests with utmost privacy and solitude, keeping casitas and villas far apart, allowing them to feel like they’ve got paradise all to themselves — and the personal butler assigned them for the duration of their stay, of course. Guests are flown in via chartered planes directly to the island’s private airstrip and get to enjoy top-notch amenities from spa treatments to watersports and floating bars.


Amanpulo pier | © Yasuo Kida / Flickr

It’s the country’s ‘Last Ecological Frontier’

Palawan is also known as the Philippines’ “Last Ecological Frontier”. Its forests and seas are home to impressive biodiversity and it is this kind of natural beauty that keeps visitors coming. But this title is also a good reminder to travel responsibly and sustainably; to leave no trace, whether in hiking up the island’s lush mountains or diving down to its coral reefs. Tourism is expanding more rapidly than ever before, so this should be accompanied by a conscious effort to be educated and responsible travellers. It’s the only way to have all these reasons hold true for years to come.


Twin Lagoon, Coron | © Matt Kiefer / Flickr