The Best Hotels in Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo's bustling Ameya-yokocho market
Tokyo's bustling Ameya-yokocho market | © Didier ZYLBERYNG / Alamy Stock Photo
Photo of Lucy Dayman
12 March 2021

No matter your taste, budget or style, there’s something for everyone in Tokyo. Each neighbourhood offers a unique character: Ginza is home to luxury skyscrapers, while Koenji, the gritty, art-loving corner, is just a short ride from Shinjuku. Elsewhere, the historic Ueno district offers a laid-back experience. Novelty, luxury, budget, designer – here’s our pick of the best hotels in the city.

Trunk Hotel

Boutique Hotel
Map View
Trunk Hotel
Courtesy of Trunk Hotel / Expedia

Quite possibly the most influential player in Tokyo’s inner-city lifestyle hotel scene, Trunk has attractions that go far beyond the effortlessly cool interior design. It’s a short stroll from the fashion-forward Cat Street in Harajuku and the heart of Shibuya. It’s also a popular drop-in space for creatives and freelancers who take up hot real estate in the moodily lit bar lounge.

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Hoshino Resorts OMO5 Tokyo Otsuka

Resort
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Hoshino Resorts OMO5 Tokyo Otsuka
Courtesy of Hoshino Resorts OMO5 Tokyo Otsuka / Expedia

Otsuka is a neighbourhood on the Yamanote (Tokyo’s city loop line); unlike its line brethren, it’s a lot more – dare we say – unknown. That under-the-radar reputation is sure to change thanks to the impossibly cool OMO5. Born from the brains behind some of the most impressive hotels in Tokyo, it’s a youth-focused retreat that blends design and luxury and injects the neighbourhood with an infectious sense of fun.

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Mandarin Oriental Tokyo

Hotel
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Mandarin Oriental
Courtesy of Mandarin Oriental Tokyo / Hotels.com

With a lobby that sits on the 37th floor, serving spectacular city views, the Mandarin Oriental Tokyo makes an immediate impact. The expectation might be high following check-in, but the rest of this luxury establishment doesn’t disappoint. Open suites play host to carefully positioned furniture and floor-to-ceiling windows with cloud-framed views – you’re practically in heaven. If you can drag yourself from your suite, the hotel also houses a top-notch spa and 12 drinking and dining establishments.

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Aman Tokyo

Boutique Hotel, Hotel
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Aman Tokyo
Courtesy of Aman Tokyo / Expedia

Standing tall in the Otemachi Tower, overlooking the heart of the financial district, Aman Tokyo is a fine specimen of a luxury hotel. It draws design inspiration from traditional Japanese residences, blending organic materials such as washi paper and wood with sleek modern finishes, all backdropped by skyline views. Sample upmarket sushi at the Musashi by Aman, then soak in the vistas from the slate-coloured spa.

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Tsuki

Hotel
Map View
Tsuki
Courtesy of Tsuki / Expedia

Born from the mastermind architects at Torao+Hsieh, Tsuki cuts a striking figure with a slim, silver-grey silhouette. In the upper-class neighbourhood of Ginza, the hotel blends the luxury of the area with a more “downtown” appreciation for laid-back fun. The interior is youthful, with blue block colours backdropped by muted wood. The bar, however, is a little more serious, but only about sake, featuring deliciously obscure brands from across the map.

Hoshinoya Tokyo

Boutique Hotel, Ryokan
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Hoshinoya Tokyo
Courtesy of Hoshinoya Tokyo / Hotels.com

A mysterious black monolith sitting in the financial heart of Tokyo, Hoshinoya is an elegant escape wrapped up in an enigmatic package. It blends modern luxury hotel planning with ryokan (traditional inn) designs, making this complex the epitome of what makes Tokyo such an exciting city – a place that meets at the intersection of past and future. Each floor is exclusively accessible to the guests staying there, retaining that mysterious allure.

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Shangri-La Hotel Tokyo

Hotel
Map View
Shangri-La Hotel
Courtesy of Shangri-La Hotel Tokyo / Hotels.com
The Shangri-La Hotel is as well-positioned as it is extravagant. This legendary luxury hotel is next to the Tokyo Station, just a 10-minute stroll from the Imperial Palace. It’s home to classically designed rooms that lean to European tastes, world-class restaurants and the pamper-heavy Chi Spa. The hotel takes up the top 11 floors of the Marunouchi Trust Tower Main Building, so excellent views are guaranteed.

The Okura Tokyo

Hotel
Map View
The Okura Tokyo
Courtesy of The Okura Tokyo / Expedia

Reopened in 2019 following a mammoth four-year renovation, the Okura Tokyo is one of the longest-serving hotels in the city, showcasing a modern face and timeless style. Like the hexagonal lanterns hanging from the ceiling, many of the hotel design pieces have been meticulously recreated to ensure the ambience is as true to the Okura legacy as possible. And with sumptuous dining, an East-meets-West wellness offering and one of the largest hotel ballrooms in Tokyo, it’s as legendary as ever.

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Muji Hotel Ginza

Hotel
Map View

While it lies in the most upmarket neighbourhood in Tokyo, the Muji Hotel Ginza stays true to the “anti-gorgeous” and “anti-cheap” ethos of the lifestyle brand. At the same time, it fits with the luxury aesthetics that have made Ginza, as a district, renowned. The hotel features two galleries, a salon, a library, a lounge space and a classically influenced Japanese restaurant, proving minimalistic doesn’t mean boring.

InterContinental ANA Tokyo

Business Hotel, Chain Hotel
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InterContinental ANA Tokyo
Courtesy of InterContinental ANA Tokyo / Hotels.com

In the heart of the Arks Hills commercial complex, in the international suburb of Akasaka, the InterContinental ANA Tokyo is a short walk from the Imperial Palace. With views of the Tokyo Tower, it’s all about luxury here. The hotel regularly hosts seasonal events, such as the Chocolate Sensations festival that showcases the best chocolatiers from Japan and abroad. It’s also home to the two-Michelin-star Pierre Gagnaire French restaurant, the popular Karin Chinese restaurant and the Steak House.

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Park Hyatt Tokyo

Suite Hotel
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The Park Hyatt
Courtesy of Park Hyatt Tokyo / Hotels.com

The Park Hyatt Tokyo is arguably Japan’s most famous hotel, serving as the backdrop for Sophia Coppola’s cult hit Lost in Translation (2003), starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Right in the middle of Shinjuku, one of the most vibrant neighbourhoods in Tokyo, it’s surrounded by bars, cafes, restaurants and other nightlife hangouts. It’s also home to the New York Grill – a bar on the 52nd floor with one of the best views in the city.

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  • BnA Hotel Koenji

    Independent Hotel
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    BnA Koenji
    Courtesy of BnA Hotel Koenji / Hotels.com

    The B and A in the name stands for Bed and Art, the two things on which this hotel was founded. Size-wise, its humble with just two rooms, but the concept is big. It commissioned the most exciting contemporary artists in the city to paint the bedrooms how they saw fit. Established to help fund the Tokyo art scene, the hotel gives the artists responsible a percentage of the fee every time a room is booked, thus providing funding for their creative pursuits. The BnA group also has another hotel in Akihabara, a worthy choice for those who want to be right in the heart of the gamer geek action.

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    Book and Bed Tokyo

    Boutique Hotel
    Map View
    Book and Bed
    Courtesy of Book and Bed Tokyo / Hotels.com

    There’s something comforting about curling up surrounded by piles of dog-eared books filled with pages ready to provide an escape. The Book and Bed’s team know this love of books all too well, creating an entire hostel dedicated to it. It’s a library-bookshop-hotel hybrid where you are invited to crawl between its shelves of novels and drift into a literary slumber. Within a short stroll of Ikebukuro station, it provides easy access to the rest of Tokyo – if you manage to put down your book and drag yourself out of bed, that is.

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    The Ritz-Carlton Tokyo

    Hotel
    Map View
    The Ritz-Carlton Tokyo
    Courtesy of The Ritz-Carlton Tokyo / Hotels.com
    Tokyo’s Ritz-Carlton sits in the downtown Roppongi district in the city’s second-tallest skyscraper, the Midtown Tower. Make good use of the seven dining and drinking options, and take advantage of the sweeping views by requesting a room on the higher floors. An indoor pool, a spa and a whirlpool with city skyline views are also available. Enjoy luxurious suites, dine on delicious food or relax by the pool while taking in stunning city vistas.
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    The Peninsula Tokyo

    Spa Hotel, Hotel
    Map View
    The Peninsula Tokyo
    Courtesy of The Peninsula Tokyo / Hotels.com

    A hotel of grand proportions, the Peninsula Tokyo houses luxurious rooms and suites with standout interior design. The hotel also organises the Peninsula Academy, offering unforgettable experiences such as sake brewery tours, talks and workshops with renowned artists of Japanese traditions (such as washi-paper art) and courses on the art of the kimono.

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    Mimaru Tokyo Ueno North

    Boutique Hotel
    Map View
    Mimaru Tokyo Ueno North
    Courtesy of Mimaru Tokyo Ueno North / Expedia

    A great choice for those on the hunt for a more homely experience when staying in Japan is Mimaru Tokyo Ueno North. A super stylish, private apartment-style option, it’s perfect for long-term stays or larger travelling groups. The apartments feature open-plan, studio-style rooms with kitchen, living and dining spaces. The property will lend you a free smartphone during your stay so that you can make free calls within Japan and navigate the city without maxing out data limits, which is a nice added touch.

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    These recommendations were updated on March 12, 2021 to keep your travel plans fresh.

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