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8 Unusual Things To Do In Hong Kong

Picture of Sally Gao
Updated: 10 August 2018
Those who’ve exhausted Hong Kong‘s most mainstream attractions are probably ready to embrace some of the alternative activities this great city has to offer. Read on for the top quirky things to do and see in Hong Kong for locals and visitors alike.

Dine At A Cartoon Restaurant

If there’s one thing you need to know about Hongkongers, it’s that they love their Japanese cartoon characters – enough to eat them. The most famous cartoon restaurant is Hello Kitty Chinese Cuisine, a dim sum restaurant where down to the very last custard bun and shrimp dumpling bears Hello Kitty’s face and trademark pink bow.

But that’s not all. Dim Sum Icon is all about Gutedama, an adorable Japanese egg, while Moomin Cafe, a Tokyo import, offers traditional Nordic dishes themed around Moomin, an anthropomorphic hippopotamus.

Red Skelington/CC BY-SA 2.0/Flickr
Red Skelington/CC BY-SA 2.0/Flickr

Watch Old Hong Kong Movies

The Hong Kong Film Archive hosts regular screenings of movie gems from Hong Kong’s past, including many silent films and black-and-white films. There are also modern documentaries as well as foreign films. Check out their schedule on their website.

chumsdock cheng/CC BY-SA 2.0/Flickr
chumsdock cheng/CC BY-SA 2.0/Flickr

Visit The World’s Biggest Noah’s Ark Replica

Hong Kong isn’t exactly a thriving hotspot of Christianity, which is why it’s all the more bizarre that the city possesses the world’s largest model of Noah’s Ark. The 450 foot-long behemoth is situated in a biblical theme park in Ma Wan, and visitors can board the vessels to visit the park’s indoor exhibits.

Eat Stinky Tofu

Stinky tofu’s odor is extremely off-putting to those who encounter it for the first time but don’t let that stop you from trying one of Hong Kong’s best street food delicacies that is fermented in a brine of vegetables, milk, meat and herbs and covered in a sweet and spicy sauce, loved by locals. This dish is abundantly found amongst the street food stalls in Mongkok, especially in and around the Ladies’ Market.

Marilyn Acosta/CC BY-SA 2.0/Flickr
Marilyn Acosta/CC BY-SA 2.0/Flickr

Visit The Bird Market

In Yuen Po Bird Garden, hawkers sell birds and souvenirs amongst the environs of a traditionally landscaped Chinese garden. You’ll see many kinds of beautiful and exotic songbirds here, as well as locals who have come to take their birds out for a ‘walk’ as they socialize with other bird enthusiasts.

Gavin Anderson/CC BY-SA 2.0/Flickr
Gavin Anderson/CC BY-SA 2.0/Flickr | © Gavin Anderson / Flickr

Go On A Catered Junk Cruise

Traditional chinese sailing ships, otherwise known as junks, used to be abundant in Victoria Harbour. The golden days of Hong Kong’s fishing industry are over but nowadays you can catch an evening cruise on the Aqua Luna, which is operated by the renowned Aqua Restaurant Group. The handcrafted vessel is modelled after a traditional wooden junk, including Hong Kong’s signature crimson sails. A full dinner cruise package includes either a 10-dish or 6-dish set menu, with VIP views of the harbor and the nightly Symphony of Lights show.

Harvey Barrison/CC BY-SA 2.0/Flickr
Harvey Barrison/CC BY-SA 2.0/Flickr

Visit A Rabbit Cafe

Hop into Rabbitland, a cute vegetarian cafe whose biggest draw is the twelve abandoned rabbits that visitors get to pet during their visit. The owners have taken steps to protect the rabbits’ well-being. Be aware that there’s a limit to the number of customers at any given time and tail and ear pulling are prohibited, as are children under six. You should be aware that Rabbitland has nevertheless drawn criticism from animal rights groups, who claim that the environment is stressful for the rabbits.

John Gillespie/CC BY-SA 2.0/Flickr
John Gillespie/CC BY-SA 2.0/Flickr

Explore The Hong Kong GeoPark

Officially named the Hong Kong UNESCO Global Geopark, this conservation area is dedicated to Hong Kong’s unique geological formations and comprises two main regions: the volcanic rock region in Sai Kung and the sedimentary rock region in the North-East New Territories. Free tours of the different Geopark sites are available on the regular basis, some of which involve exploring islands, sea caves and abandoned fishing villages.

Tomoaki INABA/CC BY-SA 2.0/Flickr
Tomoaki INABA/CC BY-SA 2.0/Flickr