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 Road congestion has become a serious problem in China's big cities, Shanghai © Humphry/Shutterstock
Road congestion has become a serious problem in China's big cities, Shanghai © Humphry/Shutterstock
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Chinese man cycles 300 miles in the wrong direction trying to get home for New Year

Picture of Matthew Keegan
Updated: 27 January 2017
For one Chinese man, ‘taking the long way home’ was taken to a whole new level after cycling 310 miles in the wrong direction.

The man was determined to make it home for Chinese New Year, so much so that he was prepared to cycle a distance of over 1,000 miles. The only problem was, he was heading in the wrong direction – 310 miles in the wrong direction!

The unnamed man, a young migrant worker, only found out 30 days into his mammoth trip after he was stopped by police 310 miles off course, in the central Chinese province of Anhui.

He had hoped to cycle from the city of Rizhao in Shandong province to his home in Qiqihar, Heilongjiang province, a total distance of over 1,000 miles.

An unidentified man rides a bicycle during air pollution in Beijing
An unidentified man rides a bicycle during air pollution in Beijing | ©Nahorski Pavel/Shutterstock

Why cycle?

It’s understood that the man didn’t have the money to afford other means of transport and so he decided to cycle. He set off in December and due to his low funds had been living in internet cafes for some time.

On January 21 he was stopped by police for riding on a highway, which cannot be used by cyclists. It was only then that he was informed that he had been cycling South instead of North.

According to reports, he had been unable to read maps or the road signs and was relying on the help of passers-by.

Fortunately for the man, Police and workers at the highway toll station put money together to help buy the man a train ticket home. Some online users of popular Chinese social media sites praised the police and highway toll station workers for their help.

Homeward-bound

Despite the man’s initial misadventure, thanks to the police and toll station workers who paid for his train ticket home, it’s likely that he’ll make it home in time to celebrate the festive season with his family.

Many of China’s 282 million migrants make the trip home for Lunar New Year.

About three billion trips are expected to be made across China during the peak festive period, including more than 350 million rail journeys and 58 million flights.