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Sihanoukville's Party Cruises | © DR Travel Photo and Video/Shutterstock
Sihanoukville's Party Cruises | © DR Travel Photo and Video/Shutterstock
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A Guide To Sihanoukville's Party Cruises

Picture of Marissa
Updated: 2 January 2018
The Cambodian coastal town of Sihanoukville is known as party central, with the stretch of beach littered with bars and party spots. And for those wanting to take the party to the sea, there are a swathe of booze cruises waiting to set sale.

As soon as you hit the stretch of sand at Sihanoukville, you’ll be bombarded with people dishing out flyers, offering everything from bar sales and free shots to happy hours and boat trips overflowing with booze.

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A party cruise in Sihanoukville | © Sihanoukville Booze Cruise

In line with Sihanoukville’s swathe of bars, the party cruise options range from boutique boats to triple deckers. Whether you fancy hiring a boat for yourselves and engaging in some DIY partying on the high seas or joining a pre-organised trip, we’ve got your options covered.

If the idea of an intimate booze cruise tickles your fancy and you’re travelling with a group, or have hooked up with some like-minded travellers along the way, then why not book your own boat?

There is no shortage of touts trawling the beach offering trips, which can be tailormade to suit your needs. And the best part about it is you can bring your own booze on board, making this a great option for those on a budget.

For those wanting to join in on the party, then there are a host of party boats setting sail from Sihanoukville. The Party Boat is one of the most popular, and includes a day of island-hopping, swimming in the sea, and eating and drinking.

Setting off from Serendipity Beach Pier, the day-trip stops off at Koh Tas for a snorkelling break before heading to Saracen Bay on Koh Rong Samloem for lunch, and returning to Sihanoukville by about 5pm.

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Many of the party boats stop off at the islands | © Aleksandar Todorovic/Shutterstock

The triple-decker boat can hold up to 120 people and is equipped with a first-floor restaurant, a bar and dance floor on the middle deck, with a DJ pumping out the tunes, and a sundeck and more music on the top floor. A boat trip costs $25 and can be booked by emailing info@thepartyboat.asia.

The Sihanoukville Booze Cruise is another popular option, with the weekly boat trips filling up fast and visitors wanting to have some fun while riding the waves.

Every Monday, the double-decker boat sets sale at 1.30pm and features a line-up of DJs to keep the party at a high. Guests are treated to a free drink on arrival, as well as free shots to keep the momentum going throughout the afternoon. Tickets cost $12 and can be bought from The Big Easy and Jack & Daniels in Sihanoukville.

Popular Dolphin Shack Beach Club is also riding the wave of booze cruises, launching its own option in the form of a pirate-themed party. Departing early afternoon, the boat sails to three or four islands, stopping off so guests can swim, walk the plank into the water, sunbath or take a stroll along the beach. Upon return, party-goers can indulge in a buffet at Lemon Moon Shack, next to Dolphin Shack on the beach.

Other bars, such as JJ’s Playground and Nap House, also put on booze cruises and have party boats, with tickets available from the bars during a raucous night out. So, check them out first and see what tickles your fancy.

When booking a booze cruise off your own bat, it’s worth remembering that health and safety are virtually non-existent in Cambodia. There have been previous complaints about some companies dangerously overcrowding their boats, shoddy conditions and organisations not carrying out great practices.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions, book with a reputable bar or company and listen to recommendations.

A scene shot at Sihanoukville
A scene shot at Sihanoukville | © Screen Australia