Explore your world
Al Attarine Madrasa © just_a_cheeseburger
Al Attarine Madrasa © just_a_cheeseburger

20 Unmissable Attractions in Fez

Picture of Yasmine Guermoudi
Web Content Writer
Updated: 17 September 2017

Fez is one of the imperial cities of Morocco, and home to the oldest university of all time, Al Quaraouiyine Mosque. However, there are plenty more things to do in Fez than just visit the university or the tanneries. Here are 20 attractions you must see while visiting one of the oldest medinas in the world.

Al-Attarine Madrasa

Built in the 14th century, this is a mesmerizing building where you can admire the Moroccan architecture, tile-work, and woodcarvings.

Al Attarine Madrasa © just_a_cheeseburger

Dar el Makhzen or The Royal Palace

An iconic place to visit to take great pictures, since the palace itself isn’t open to the public.

Dar Makhzen © Michal Osmenda

Bab Bou Jeloud

The iconic gate to the Old Medina, makes for amazing photos with its unique tiles.

Bad Bou Jeloud © Bjørn Christian Tørrissen

Dar Batha

This museum is home to woodcarvings, iron work, embroidery, carpets and jewelry inspired from the Hispano-Moorish era in Morocco.

5, Place Batha Oued Fejjaline, Fes, Morocco, +212 5356-37800

Dar Batha Museum © Mike Prince

Nejjarine Museum of Wooden Arts Crafts

Admire the architecture and artifacts of this museum, located within one of the oldest hotels in Fez.

Place an-Nejjarine, Fes, Morocco

El Nejjarine Museum © Jules Antonio

Jnan sbil

This peaceful oasis, once an imperial garden, is somewhere you can enjoy the lake, sound of birds and fruit trees to get away from the busy medina.

Jnane Sbil © mhobl

Chouara Tannery

This is the most famous tannery of the world, where animal skins are dyed in the most traditional way.

Fez Tannery © Elena

Al Quaraouiyine Mosque

The oldest university in the world, built in 857 AD. You won’t be able to step inside if you are non-Muslim, but you can get a great view from nearby rooftop terraces.

Quaraouiyine Mosque © Younesberrada

Madersa Bou Inania

Famous for its green-tiled minaret, this building is one of the few religious buildings in Fez that can be entered by non-Muslims.

Rue Talaa Sghira, Fes, Morocco, +212 671-732265

Medersa Bou Inania © Singa Hitam

Mellah (Jewish Quarter)

Although it is no longer home to the Jewish community, you can still see its rich history through the architecture and synagogues.

Fez Coffee Place in the Mellah © Anonymous

Borj Nord Arms Museum

With an amazing collection of arms, Borj Nord also has one of the best views of the medina.

Borj Nord © Lorenz C. Töpperwien

Go carpet shopping

Carpet shopping is a must if you are going to Morocco. All carpets are handmade and each one of them is different from the other.

Moroccan Carpets © Tim Huggiers

Ibn Danan Synagogue

This Jewish sanctuary was built in the 17th century by a wealthy merchant called Mimoun Ben Sidan.

Ibn Danan Synagogue © Mike Prince

Seffarine Square

This square is one of the oldest in the medina, with little shopping stores full of Moroccan handmade goodies.

Seffarine Square © Mike Prince

Mount Zalagh

Far from the crowded medina, Mount Zalagh is covered with olive groves and scented by wild lavender, overlooking the whole city of Fez and surrounding landscapes.

View of Fez © High Contrast

Merenid Tombs

Located on a hill above Fez, these tombs built in the 13th century contain royal members of the Merenid Dynasty.

Merenid Tombs © Pragna Sen

Bab Makina Plaza

This historical stone plaza hosts great music festivals in Fez.

Festival Fez © Ramon Fornós

Medersa Sehrij

Another great monument for intellectuals. This university was built in 1321 and is well known due to the square pool in the heart of the building.

Medersa Sahrij © Chris Martin

Watch a Belly Dancer show

If you are in Morocco, belly dancing is one of the must-see things. You can find them at restaurants or hotels.

Belly Dancer © Chris_Parfitt

Fes El Jdid

Fes El Jdid is an extension of Fes Medina, built by the Merenids in 1276 because they thought that the medina was too small to built their royal palaces.

Fes Jdid © Bernard Gagnon