Cabbage Man: Han Bing's 'Walking the Cabbage' Art Project

From Ginza to Times Square, from Tiananmen to Champs-Elysées, Han Bing and his cabbage have travelled the world. Through his photographic series, Han Bing asks viewers to stop and consider: What do we hurtle towards? And at what cost?

Han Bing, 'Walking the Cabbage in Tiananmen', 2000.

Han Bing, Walking the Cabbage in Tiananmen, 2000. Image courtesy: Han Bing Art.

Walking the Cabbage in Tiananmen (2000) features an androgynous figure walking a cabbage in Beijing's Tiananmen Square. Nothing unusual about that, his easy pose with arm akimbo seems to suggest.

The artist behind the work -- and in front of the camera -- is Chinese artist Han Bing. Han specialises in photography and site-specific performance art in which some of his performances span nearly a decade and cross continental divisions. Walking the Cabbage in Tiananmen is part of one such series of performative photographs. Han produced the Walking the Cabbage series over a period of eight years, from 2000-2008.

Han Bing, Me and My Cabbage at Suma Bay, Jiangsu, 2005.

Han Bing, Me and My Cabbage at Suma Bay, Jiangsu, 2005. Image courtesy: Han Bing Art.

Walking the Cabbage in Tiananmen is one of the earliest photographs from the series; the journey continues with Han Bing walking the cabbage in the Houhai district of Beijing, Han Bing walking the cabbage in a subway carriage of Beijing (2004), Han Bing cradling his cabbage in Jiangsu Province (2005), Han Bing walking the cabbage in Miami Beach, USA and Chinatown (2007). From the Great Wall to Times Square, from Champs-Elysées to Ginza, from rural village to trendy high streets, Han Bing walks and walks, posing with his cabbage as if oblivious to the gawking crowds and ever-present camera.

Han Bing,Walking the Cabbage series, 2000-2008. Image courtesy: Han Bing Art.

He isn't, of course.

According to the artist, his intention in making art is for 'people to see how much of our daily lives are routines that we've blindly absorbed'. And in this work, Han does just that through his subtle manipulation of hackneyed imagery which raises important questions about contemporary Chinese social norms.

Walking the Cabbage in Tiananmen is a particularly ambitious undertaking. In it, Han takes on one of the most iconic of symbols of China -- the Forbidden City. To the everyday Chinese, the Forbidden City is a symbol of imperial power; this frontal view from Tiananmen Square is also a place of great historical significance in modern China. Here on the 1st of October 1949, Mao Zedong proclaimed the founding of the People's Republic of China, reportedly declaring that 'The Chinese People have Stood Up'.

Tiananmen Square, 1988. Image courtesy: Derzsi Elekes Andor/Wikicommons.

Today, the site's political and historical significance is overshadowed by its new identity as the necessary photo-op for seemingly every tourist who passes through Beijing. In this sense, Han Bing's photo is so obvious as to be banal.

But all is not as it seems, for the composition demands viewers to ask questions. What is the artist doing with a cabbage in the midst of Tiananmen Square? And here lies the creative brilliance of the composition. Han ignores a half-century of art history discourse as he seemingly fails to realise that his is an age where iconography has become decidedly passé; this series of works employ ordinary symbols to create meaning.

Han Bing, 'Comfort', 2002; 'The Nouveau Riche Leads the People', 2007.

Han Bing, 'Comfort' from Everyday Precious series, 2002; 'The Nouveau Riche Leads the People' from Theatre of Modernisation series, 2007. Image courtesy: Han Bing Art.

The Cabbage is a particular favourite in Han's oeuvre. According to Han's website, the Chinese Cabbage is:

...a quintessentially Chinese symbol of sustenance and comfort for poor Chinese turned upside down. If a full stock of cabbage for the winter was once a symbol of material well-being in China, nowadays the nouveau riche have cast aside modest (monotonous) cabbage in favor of ostentatious gluttony in fancy restaurants where waste signifies status...Yet, for the poor and struggling, the realities of cabbage as a subsistence bottom line have not changed—what's changed is the value structure that dictates what—and who—is valuable or worthless in Chinese society.

Omit the cabbage and the picture becomes almost ordinary as the requisite tourist picture in front of Tiananmen.

Head and Shoulders

Knowing the iconographic significance of this site, Han Bing plays with the imagery through his composition. From the low-angle view of the camera, Han Bing dominates the composition; he literally stands head and shoulder above Tiananmen's great wall.

This striking view point lends a monumentality to Han and his cabbage that the camera emphasises by focusing on the foreground and blurring the background. This viewpoint brings to mind the imagery of old Communist posters depicting the exuberant triumph of the proletariat. And if one so chooses, one could read into the picture a political statement.

With his casual stance, Han lulls the viewer into forgetting the meticulous framing of the image; he sneakily causes us to forget what is missing from this iconic view -- the framed portrait of Chairman Mao. But the image could just be another tourist photo, where the tourist in his eagerness to show friends that he's made it to Tiananmen, inadvertently blocks out the nation's most famous face. Make of that what you will, the image suggests.

Perhaps politics is indeed a distraction. Although Chinese art in the West is often viewed politically, with Ai Weiwei being the poster child of political criticism, Han's works seek instead to confront the problems faced by ordinary Chinese people in the march towards modernisation and urbanisation. In this image, Tiananmen Square becomes a mere backdrop for Han and his cabbage, a suitable starting point for his photographic series and his critique of contemporary Chinese values.

Han Bing, 'Walking the Cabbage' series

Han Bing, Walking the Cabbage series, 2000-2008. Image courtesy: Han Bing Art.

Placing the focal point on Han and his cabbage on a leash, Han seeks to address ‘the way our everyday practices serve to constitute ‘normalcy’ and our identities are often constituted by the act of claiming objects as our possessions’. The modest cabbage on a leash ‘offers a visual interrogation of contemporary social values’. Once a symbol of well-being and a full stomach, it has now been discarded for bigger, better, more expensive, more impressive and more frivolous thrills. And those will, in turn, be cast off for something better.

As Han Bing writes in his essay 'Everyday Precious and the Predicament of "Modernisation"’:

We have been informed that we are on the road to happiness, striding from the deceptive fantasies of the past into a feverish frenzy of economic modernization. The effects of so-called globalization and modernization rain down on us like blows to the face as we hurtle from one world toward another, rushing towards the mirage of a make-believe China, bloated with decadence and grotesque with vulgar self-indulgence...Five thousand years shriek and vanish into mountains of urban rubble, but the direction of this new life cannot be seen clearly in these concrete skies, or through the haze of dust spreading endlessly like a veil.

With Chinese society rushing ever onward and upward, Han Bing with his humble cabbage, asks viewers to stop and consider: what do we hurtle towards? And at what cost?


By Stephanie Chang Avila

The Culture Trip showcases the best of art, food, culture and travel for every country in the world. Have a look at our China or Asia sections to find out more or become involved.